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Antarctica & Ross Sea Expedition end in Hobart

23 Days FROM USD 33,449

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Overview

Step aboard the sleek, elegant and luxurious Crystal Endeavor, the largest and most spacious expedition yacht in the world, and sail in absolute style to explore Antarctica, the Ross Sea, McMurdo Sound and the Ross Ice Shelf. This is Antarctic cruising taken to another level.  Set foot on the Antarctic continent, cruise through pack ice, encounter colonies of Adélie and emperor penguins and make glacier landings.  Helicopters transport you to survey the imposing Ross Ice Shelf and to visit historic huts and scientific stations. Marvel at the massive Drygalski Ice Tongue the penguin-blanketed Possession Islands and the isolated yet beautiful Balleny Islands. You can even experience the underwater world of the Antarctic in the ship’s submersible. Back on board, treat yourself to an indulgent spa, soak up the scenery as you relax in the glass-enclosed solarium or enjoy room service brought to you by your personal butler. This is a cruise of unrivalled standards. 

Optional Activities :

Trip Code: ACTSARSH

Location: Antarctica

Ship: Crystal Endeavor

CRUISE ITINERARY

The historic port of Lyttelton serves as the gateway to Christchurch, the largest city on New Zealand’s South Island. Traditionally considered the most English of New Zealand’s cities, there is much to explore in vibrant Christchurch, from its neo-Gothic stone buildings and beautiful botanical gardens, to its picturesque Avon River lined by graceful willows. Further afar, the Canterbury Plains, snow-capped Southern Alps and numerous rivers beckon with their enchanting beauty and wildlife.

Christchurch (Lyttleton) New Zealand

Aboard the world’s largest and most spacious luxury expedition yacht, you’ll find an array of unmatched experiences to immerse in during your days at sea. Indulge your senses at the serene Crystal Life Spa & Salon, work-out at our state-of-the-art fitness center, and learn about art, history and worldly destinations with our engaging enrichment programs. Or simply lounge poolside in solarium bliss while our attentive crew caters to your every whim. As evening arrives, indulge in the renowned culinary creations of Nobu Matsuhisa, enjoy special wine-makers dinners, lounge in luxurious spaces, or try your luck at the action-packed Resorts World At Sea Casino.

Cruising the Southern Ocean - Day 2 to 5

Aboard the world’s largest and most spacious luxury expedition yacht, you’ll find an array of unmatched experiences to immerse in during your days at sea. Indulge your senses at the serene Crystal Life Spa & Salon, work-out at our state-of-the-art fitness center, and learn about art, history and worldly destinations with our engaging enrichment programs. Or simply lounge poolside in solarium bliss while our attentive crew caters to your every whim. As evening arrives, indulge in the renowned culinary creations of Nobu Matsuhisa, enjoy special wine-makers dinners, lounge in luxurious spaces, or try your luck at the action-packed Resorts World At Sea Casino.

Crossing the Antarctic Circle

History buffs are in for a treat at Cape Adare where the remains of the oldest buildings in Antarctica are located. The two prefabricated huts were built on Ridley Beach during the 1899 expedition of Norwegian explorer Carsten Borchgrevink and were later used by British explorer Robert Falcon Scott’s team in 1911. The historic huts are surrounded by the world’s largest Adélie penguin colony.

Cape Adare, Antarctica

The majestic peaks of the Admiralty Mountains welcome you to Cape Hallett. Framed by the Ross Sea, the Southern Ocean and several glaciers, the ranges are situated in Antarctica’s northeastern Victoria Land. Discovered by British explorer James Clark Ross in 1841, the cape is known for its large Adélie penguin colony. Just to the north of Cape Hallett lies Cape Roget, marking the north entrance to Moubray Bay. Cape Roget is home to an emperor penguin rookery.

Cape Hallett and Roget, Antarctica

The iceberg-dotted Terra Nova Bay beckons with the possibility of stepping foot on the continent of Antarctica. Nestled along the coast of Victoria Land between Cape Washington and the Drygalski Ice Tongue, a massive glacier that flows out into the ocean, the bay area hosts a few scientific stations, including Italy’s Zucchelli Station, known for its research on marine biology, oceanography, seismology and more. Adélie and emperor penguins as well as Weddell seals may be spotted in the bay.

Terra Nova Bay, Antarctica

Discovered by Captain James Ross in 1840, this island is home to Antarctica’s biggest scientific station, McMurdo Station, and Scott’s Discovery Hut. At 950 square miles, it is often considered part of the Antarctic mainland due the continuous presence of the ice sheet. Formed by four volcanoes – including the world’s southernmost active volcano, Erebus, and the dormant Terror, both named for Ross’ expedition ships – it is the highest island in Antarctica and the sixth highest in the world.

Ross Island, Antarctica - Day 10 & 11

Referred to as the “final hint of civilization” in Antarctica, McMurdo Station is home base for research to many geologists, oceanographers, physicists, glaciologists and many others. Coupled with guided tours of Scott Base and other significant sites with expedition staff and liaisons from the United States National Science Foundation and Environmental Protection Agency and hikes to Observation Hill, time spent in this ethereal place will strike awe in even the boldest adventurers.

Mc Murdo Sound, Antarctica

In this remote expanse of Antarctica that resembles Mars more than it does earth, the McMurdo Dry Valleys represent a region of earth where life approaches its environment limits – remarkable ice-free dry deserts boasting a geological playground of fossils and salt accumulations. Be among the few to tread in this place that is unlike any other in the world, reaching the scientific stations and historic huts by helicopter.

Marble Point / Dry Valleys Region, Antarctica

Scientific phenomena and other curiosities abound on and around the world’s largest ice shelf, responsible for stabilizing the Antarctic Ice Sheet; where certain fish species swim upside down and icebergs are formed in tubes. The Ross Ice Shelf has captivated explorers and researchers for centuries, from Amundsen and Scott to today’s multidisciplinary scientists who tirelessly study its stability. Survey this massive wonder during helicopter expeditions and see what few other travelers ever have.

Cruising the Ross Ice Shelf

A treasure trove of geologic history, scenic Coulman Island is located in the Ross Sea off the coast of northern Victoria Land, Antarctica. Its picturesque landscape of mountains and cliffs dappled with snow is actually a complex of shield volcanoes, massive dome-shaped formations built of lava flows. Its most notable feature is the three-mile-wide, 2,300-foot-deep caldera on the southern end of the island. Coulman’s untouched terrain hosts a large colony of emperor penguins.

Coulman Island, Antarctica

Discovered in 1841 by British explorer James Clark Ross, the Possession Islands are a collection of small islands and islets situated off the northeastern coast of Victoria Land, Antarctica. They were named by Ross to memorialize his taking possession of the islands on behalf of Britain. Vast numbers of Adélie penguins make their home on the islands. Foyn Island, one of the largest islands in the group, is almost completely blanketed by a penguin colony.

Possesions Island, Antarctica

Aboard the world’s largest and most spacious luxury expedition yacht, you’ll find an array of unmatched experiences to immerse in during your days at sea. Indulge your senses at the serene Crystal Life Spa & Salon, work-out at our state-of-the-art fitness center, and learn about art, history and worldly destinations with our engaging enrichment programs. Or simply lounge poolside in solarium bliss while our attentive crew caters to your every whim. As evening arrives, indulge in the renowned culinary creations of Nobu Matsuhisa, enjoy special wine-makers dinners, lounge in luxurious spaces, or try your luck at the action-packed Resorts World At Sea Casino.

Cruising the Southern Ocean

The isolated and pristine Balleny Islands, discovered by English sealer John Balleny in 1839, are an archipelago straddling the Antarctic Circle in the Ross Sea. The uninhabited islands and their nutrient-rich waters are part of the world’s largest marine reserve. This surreal, snow-covered wonderland of glaciated, volcanic islands and ice floes is perfect for cruising and possible sightings of humpback whales, which feed on the region’s abundant krill and plankton.

Balleny Islands, Antarctica

Aboard the world’s largest and most spacious luxury expedition yacht, you’ll find an array of unmatched experiences to immerse in during your days at sea. Indulge your senses at the serene Crystal Life Spa & Salon, work-out at our state-of-the-art fitness center, and learn about art, history and worldly destinations with our engaging enrichment programs. Or simply lounge poolside in solarium bliss while our attentive crew caters to your every whim. As evening arrives, indulge in the renowned culinary creations of Nobu Matsuhisa, enjoy special wine-makers dinners, lounge in luxurious spaces, or try your luck at the action-packed Resorts World At Sea Casino.

Cruising the Southern Ocean - Day 19 to 22

Situated between Mount Wellington and the Derwent River, Hobart is recognized as one of the world’s most beautiful harbor cities – as well as an Antarctic gateway. History adds picturesque charm to this Tasmanian capital, for there are no less than 90 buildings with National Trust classification. At Salamanca Place and Battery Point, relics of the last century’s whaling days can still be seen.

Disembark, Hobart, Tasmania
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Pricing & date

Antarctica & Ross Sea Expedition end in Hobart from USD 33,449
Departing Ending Duration
28 Jan 2021 19 Feb 2021 23
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Important Information

  • Inclusions;

    All Suite accommodation with private butler service

    Daily shore excursions, guided walks, Zodiac cruises

    Arrival and Departures Transfers (on the day of Embarkation & Dis-Embarkation)

    An experienced team of destination specialists and activity leaders

    An informative and entertaining lecture program by our team of experts

    Michelin-inspired cuisine served in six unique venues, including Nobu Matsuhisa’s Umi Uma & Sushi Bar, 

    Waterside Restaurant, Marketplace, Prego, the Vintage Room (Additonal Reservation charge Approx USD$200pp) and the Bistro

    Drinks included - Premium spirits, select wines, cocktails, champagne, beer, soft drinks, coffee and tea

    Wines, specialty coffees and teas, and light refreshments served 24 hours a day in The Pantry

    Complimentary expedition jacket (to keep)

    Complimentary use of gumboots (rental)

    Use of full-service Crystal Lift Salon & Spa and dedicated fitness facilities

    Use of two-story glass enclosed solarium with Jacuzzi and swimming pool

    Optional activities - including swimming, kayaking, snorkelling, and stand-up paddle boarding 

    Port, pilotage charges and landing fees

     

    Exclusions;

    Optional adventures via helicopter or the yacht’s private submersible

    International or doemstic flights

    Transfers not mentioned in the itinerary

    Airport arrival or departure taxes

    Passport, visa, reciprocity and vaccination charges

    Travel insurance or emergency evacuation charges

    Hotels and meals not included in itinerary

    All items of a personal nature

  • 2 (light adventure)
  • Available upon request

  • Contact us for more details

  • Season and availability

SPEAK TO A SPECIALIST

Talk to one of our Destination Specialists to plan your South American adventure and turn your dream into a reality. With exceptional knowledge and first hand experience, our consultants will assist in every way possible to make your journey the most memorable it can be, matching not only the itinerary, but the accommodation and activities to suit your style of travel and budget.

Sustainability

GUIDANCE FOR VISITORS TO THE ANTARCTIC

RECOMMENDATION XVIII-1, ADOPTED AT THE ANTARCTIC TREATY MEETING, KYOTO, 1994

Activities in the Antarctic are governed by the Antarctic Treaty of 1959 and associated agreements, referred to collectively as the Antarctic Treaty System. The Treaty established Antarctica as a zone of peace and science.

In 1991, the Antarctic Treaty Consultative Parties adopted the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty, which designates the Antarctic as a natural reserve. The Protocol sets out environmental principles, procedures and obligations for the comprehensive protection of the Antarctic environment, and its dependent and associated ecosystems. The Consultative Parties have agreed that as far as possible and in accordance with their legal system, the provisions of the Protocol should be applied as appropriate. The Environmental Protocol was ratified in January 1998.

The Environmental Protocol applies to tourism and non-governmental activities, as well as governmental activities in the Antarctic Treaty Area. It is intended to ensure that these activities, do not have adverse impacts on the Antarctic environment, or on its scientific and aesthetic values.
This Guidance for Visitors to the Antarctic is intended to ensure that all visitors are aware of, and are therefore able to comply with, the Treaty and the Protocol. Visitors are, of course, bound by national laws and regulations applicable to activities in the Antarctic.


PROTECT ANTARCTIC WILDLIFE

Taking or harmful interference with Antarctic wildlife is prohibited except in accordance with a permit issued by a national authority.

Do not use aircraft, vessels, small boats, or other means of transport in ways that disturb wildlife, either at sea or on land.
Do not feed, touch, or handle birds or seals, or approach or photograph them in ways that cause them to alter their behavior. Special care is needed when animals are breeding or molting.
Do not damage plants, for example by walking, driving, or landing on extensive moss beds or lichen-covered scree slopes.
Do not use guns or explosives. Keep noise to the minimum to avoid frightening wildlife.
Do not bring non-native plants or animals into the Antarctic, such as live poultry, pet dogs and cats, or house plants.


RESPECT PROTECTED AREAS

A variety of areas in the Antarctic have been afforded special protection because of their particular ecological, scientific, historic, or other values. Entry into certain areas may be prohibited except in accordance with a permit issued by an appropriate national authority.
Activities in and near designated Historic Sites and Monuments and certain other areas may be subject to special restrictions.

Know the locations of areas that have been afforded special protection and any restrictions regarding entry and activities that can be carried out in and near them.
Observe applicable restrictions.
Do not damage, remove, or destroy Historic Sites or Monuments or any artifacts associated with them.

RESPECT SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH

Do not interfere with scientific research, facilities or equipment.

Obtain permission before visiting Antarctic science and support facilities; reconfirm arrangements 24-72 hours before arrival; and comply with the rules regarding such visits.
Do not interfere with, or remove, scientific equipment or marker posts, and do not disturb experimental study sites, field camps, or supplies.
BE SAFE

Be prepared for severe and changeable weather and ensure that your equipment and clothing meet Antarctic standards. Remember that the Antarctic environment is inhospitable, unpredictable, and potentially dangerous.

Know your capabilities and the dangers posed by the Antarctic environment, and act accordingly. Plan activities with safety in mind at all times.
Keep a safe distance from all wildlife, both on land and at sea.
Take note of, and act on, the advice and instructions from your leaders; do not stray from your group.
Do not walk onto glaciers or large snow fields without the proper equipment and experience; there is a real danger of falling into hidden crevasses.
Do not expect a rescue service. Self-sufficiency is increased and risks reduced by sound planning, quality equipment, and trained personnel.
Do not enter emergency refuges (except in emergencies). If you use equipment or food from a refuge, inform the nearest research station or national authority once the emergency is over.
Respect any smoking restrictions, particularly around buildings, and take great care to safeguard against the danger of fire. This is a real hazard in the dry environment of Antarctica.

KEEP ANTARCTICA PRISTINE

Antarctica remains relatively pristine, the largest wilderness area on Earth. It has not yet been subjected to large-scale human perturbations. Please keep it that way.

Do not dispose of litter or garbage on land. Open burning is prohibited.
Do not disturb or pollute lakes or streams. Any materials discarded at sea must be disposed of properly.
Do not paint or engrave names or graffiti on rocks or buildings.
Do not collect or take away biological or geological specimens or man-made artifacts as a souvenir, including rocks, bones, eggs, fossils, and parts or contents of buildings.
Do not deface or vandalize buildings or emergency refuges, whether occupied, abandoned, or unoccupied.​​

 

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